Lime shows promise for controlling clubroot in canola crops

Spot-treating soil with lime could give farmers another option to stem the costly disease and improve soil health

Lime shows promise for controlling clubroot in canola cropsLime is showing promise as an additional way to help manage clubroot, a deadly disease in canola crops, University of Alberta research shows. Spot-treating soil with the mineral reduced the overall occurrence and severity of the disease by 35 to 91 per cent, growth experiments showed. The finding, published in the Canadian Journal of Plant Pathology,…

Researchers pinpoint genetic defects that cause heart failure

Alberta heart donors critical for breakthrough research, pointing way to targeted treatments

Researchers pinpoint genetic defects that cause heart failureAn international research team has identified individual genetic defects that lead to heart failure, opening the door to more targeted diagnosis, prevention and treatment. In research published recently in the academic journal Science, the team analyzed cells from 61 failing and 18 healthy hearts using single-cell genetic sequencing. “For the first time, we were able to map out…

Researchers engineering new drug to beat blood cancers

RNA technology used to target gene defects in blood cells that lead to diseases like leukemia

Researchers engineering new drug to beat blood cancersA University of Alberta researcher is hot on the trail of a new drug to combat blood cancers. Based on RNA technology — best known for the Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines — the drug targets specific gene defects in blood cells responsible for cancers such as leukemia. “With conventional cancer drugs, there is a…

New strains of wheat sought with built-in resistance to wheat midge

There’s currently only one genetic defence to protect from wheat midge – but researchers want to change that

New strains of wheat sought with built-in resistance to wheat midge Agricultural scientists in Western Canada are teaming up to give wheat a boost of built-in resistance to a destructive pest. “Wheat midge is the number one insect pest threatening wheat crops across Western Canada,” says James Harynuk, a professor in the University of Alberta’s Faculty of Science. Harynuk notes that wheat midge can cause about $60…

$1.25-million project tackles clubroot resistance in canola

Researchers and agriculture company battle the crop-damaging disease and train new scientists

$1.25-million project tackles clubroot resistance in canolaA $1.25-million research project is tackling clubroot resistance in canola to help battle new strains of the crop-damaging pathogen. Funded by agriculture company BASF, University of Alberta plant scientists Stephen Strelkov and Sheau-Fang Hwang will work to identify new sources of pathogen resistance that can be bred into canola seeds. New strains of clubroot, a soil-borne disease that attacks the…

Program celebrates 20 years of changing lives for diabetics

Edmonton Protocol team reports treatment is safe and reliable for people with hard-to-control diabetes

Program celebrates 20 years of changing lives for diabeticsAfter 20 years of perfecting their technique, the team behind the largest islet transplant program in the world reports the procedure is a safe, reliable and life-changing treatment for people with hard-to-control diabetes. In results published recently in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, the researchers report on patient survival, graft survival, insulin independence and protection from life-threatening low…

New evidence shows cancer is not as heritable as once thought

Recent review highlights need to gain a broader scientific view of cancer to better prevent and treat it

New evidence shows cancer is not as heritable as once thoughtWhile cancer is a genetic disease, the genetic component is just one piece of the puzzle – and researchers need to consider environmental and metabolic factors as well, according to a research review by a leading expert at the University of Alberta. Nearly all the theories about the causes of cancer that have emerged over the…

Study reveals why HIV remains in human tissue even after therapy

Discovery could open door to new treatments that improve our ability to eliminate the stubborn virus

Study reveals why HIV remains in human tissue even after therapyThanks to antiretroviral therapy, HIV infection is no longer the life sentence it once was. But despite the effectiveness of drugs to manage and treat the virus, it can never be fully eliminated from the human body, lingering in some cells deep in different human tissues where it goes unnoticed by the immune system. Now, new…

Oldest human DNA ever found in Africa uncovered.

Archeological detective work reveals a rare find

Oldest human DNA ever found in Africa uncovered.A University of Alberta anthropologist has uncovered the oldest human DNA yet found in Africa, shedding new light on a period of ancient human history about which little is known. Banting post-doctoral fellow and bioarcheologist Elizabeth Sawchuk found skeletal remains of a middle-aged woman on her first dig in Africa 12 years ago as a…

How antibodies are fine-tuned to fight infection

Discovery provides insight into improving vaccines, understanding cancer

How antibodies are fine-tuned to fight infectionResearchers have uncovered new information about a cellular mechanism in the immune system that provides a critical step toward a better understanding of how antibodies evolve and improve in the human body. The antibodies our immune system produces need fine-tuning to reach maximum effectiveness. When a vaccine or pathogen is first introduced into our bodies,…
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